Safety


Research

Carbon Monoxide
  • Carbon monoxide – replaces oxygen in the blood until suffocation occurs. Carbon monoxide mixes with your blood 210 times quicker than oxygen, so even getting fresh air after poisoning symptoms begin may not help and suffocation can still occur. It takes from 10 to 24 hours to rid the blood of excessive carbon monoxide.  (http://www.thriftyfun.com/tf477118.tip.html)
  • It is not safe to use open-fame cabin heaters whose combustion discharges into the cabin….the time when they are used – cold weather – is also the time when ventilation is reduced by shutting he companionway and hatches…their flames produce increased humidity, undesirable levels of carbon dioxide, and possibly carbon monoxide. Cabin heaters, then, should exhaust through their own indepdent flues or chimneys.  (Desirable and Undesirable Characteristics of Offshore Yachts, p. 155)
  • anytime you are using an open flame, oxygen is consumed and gasses like carbon-dioxide and carbon-monoxide are being produced. Regardless of whether you are going with the pot-over-the-stove route (which may require frequent trips for propane) or a kerosene heater from the hardware store (likely to saturate the air with moisture), ventilation is a must anytime combustion is used to produce heat. You should make sure that you can keep a hatch opened slightly, or have other means to allow oxygen in, like a dorade vent, at all times.  (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/her-sailnet-articles/21016-wintering-aboard.html)
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