Hull to Deck Joint


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    1. It should contribute to the overall strength and stiffness of the hull and rig
    2. For safety, it should keep the ocean out.
    3. For comfort, it should keep drips and dollops out.
    4. It should be a good platform for boat-handling and navigation gear.
    5. It should provide a safe, comfortable working area for the crew and guests.
    6. It should provide good below-deck headroom, ventilation and access.

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5 Responses to Hull to Deck Joint


  1. I recently had my Bristol 27 trucked fron Ventura Ca to Tarpon Springs Fl and now have het on a boat lift in the back yard. Enjoying your progress and well into my own refurbashing Warren Hulbert

    Submitted by: Warren Hulbert on October 31, 2010 at 1:03 am

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    • Hi Warren,

      Thanks for the comment. It’s really cool that you thought enough of a Bristol 27 to ship it all the way across the country. Please feel free to send me photos if you have some spare time and I’ll be sure to post them in the reader submitted section!

      Cheers,
      Andrew

      Submitted by: Andrew Van Dyk on October 31, 2010 at 1:06 am

      Reply
  2. The work you did on the hull deck joint looks great. I have a few questions. Did you lift the joint and place a new bed of caulk down before refastening it? After you re-glassed the joint, how will you re-install the teak toe rail, and railings, etc… I assume the original holes are covered by new glass. I have never completed any work on a boat, but I am interested in a B27 myself, and I have heard that these joints are known issues on the B27 model. Also, the boat I looked at is the one that was built after yours, hull #371.

    Good luck, looks great!

    Mike

    Submitted by: Mike on January 9, 2013 at 6:48 pm

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  3. Hello Mike,

    Thanks for your comment and questions. I’ve addressed them below:

    + Did you lift the joint and place a new bed of caulk down before refastening it?
    -> I lifted the seam with wedges, then added a thickened epoxy blend around the entire seam. Before the epoxy kicked, I installed fasteners to mate the deck and hull. This squished out a bit of the epoxy in the process as well.

    I should note that the fastener holes were all drilled before hand. I worked in tandem, with one person putting in fasteners behind as the other person worked forward adding the thickened epoxy.

    + After you re-glassed the joint, how will you re-install the teak toe rail, and railings, etc… I assume the original holes are covered by new glass.
    -> Yes, the fasteners I installed to keep the joint secured were glassed over when I glassed the exterior of the joint.

    I installed the toe rail by drilling new holes (!) through the fully glassed hull-to-deck joint. To insure the joint didn’t leak, I then glassed the toe rail (fasteners and all) to the deck. You can learn more about that project here – http://www.bristol27.com/projects/bulwark-toe-rail

    In the next few months, I will be posting a more thorough write-up of both the toe-rail and hull-to-deck projects, so keep an eye out for updates.

    Hope this helps,
    Andrew

    Submitted by: Andrew on January 10, 2013 at 11:21 am

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  4. Hi Andrew,

    I recently purchased a B27 and am planning on doing a complete rehaul on her over the next year to someday satisfy my desire to bounce around Caribean islands. This area is one that I am going to address immediately. Per the previous owner there has been slight seepage in the cabin at the deck hull joint but nothing that gets things wet. So this is number uno priority!.

    Problem is I can’t get your photos to download on this site. I have tried many different computers and the little wheel keeps spinning. Is there an alternative way that you could share these photos?

    I plan on sharing my entire rehaul process on this site to share with others.

    Thanks

    Submitted by: Scott Quigley on June 6, 2014 at 4:05 pm

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